Problems with radioisotope dating

For this purpose, isochron dating was developed, a process "that solves both of these problems (accurate date, assumptions) at once" (Stasson 1992). 2) The process must occur at a relatively uniform rate.It has been established through extensive experimentation that radioactive decay occurs at a constant rate. In this case, the initial condition is the amount of daughter isotope in the rock when it was formed.Radiometric dating utilizes the decay rates of certain radioactive atoms to date rocks or artifacts.

However, in the very principal of radiometric dating there are several vital assumptions that have to be made in order for the age to be considered valid.

Levels of carbon-14 become difficult to measure and compare after about 50,000 years (between 8 and 9 half lives; where 1% of the original carbon-14 would remain undecayed).

The question should be whether or not carbon-14 can be used to date any artifacts at all? There are a few categories of artifacts that can be dated using carbon-14; however, they cannot be more 50,000 years old.

This challenge is mainly headed by Creationism which teaches a young-earth (YE) theory.

A young earth is considered to be typically just 6,000 years old since this fits the creation account and some dating deductions from Genesis.

Leave a Reply